Technology Parents Paying ‘Fortnite’ Tutors $20 an Hour to Help Their Children

02:50  02 august  2018
02:50  02 august  2018 Source:   variety.com

Fortnite’s Solo Showdown competitive mode has returned

  Fortnite’s Solo Showdown competitive mode has returned Invites to a future Summer Showdown event could be on the line for top performersSolo Showdown is all about the competitive experience and scoring points as the mode tracks players’ performances over the course of 25 solo games. Participants earn points for their final standing — first place getting 100 points, second gets 94 third gets 91 and so on — as well as earning six points per elimination. Each players’ score is at the end of their 25 matches is the total that will go on the official leaderboard.

Parents are taking their children to “ Fortnite ” coaches to improve their chances of securing a Battle Royale win, the Wall Street Journal reports. Parents are paying up to $ 20 per hour to help their kids improve their skills in “ Fortnite ,” Epic Games’ phenomenally successful

Parents across the world are starting to pay for tutors to help their kids develop skills at Fortnite . The Wall Street Journal wrote an article detailing various parents and their children involved in this A software developer from Texas paid $ 20 an hour for his 12-year-old son to take Fortnite lessons.

  Parents Paying ‘Fortnite’ Tutors $20 an Hour to Help Their Children © Provided by Variety

Parents are taking their children to “Fortnite” coaches to improve their chances of securing a Battle Royale win, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Parents are paying up to $20 per hour to help their kids improve their skills in “Fortnite”, Epic Games’ phenomenally successful free-to-play Battle Royale game.

“Fortnite” – which is out on iPhone, Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One – encompasses a “Hunger Games”-like battle which pitches 100 players against each other, either alone or in small teams. The team or player that survives until the end wins the match.

According to those parents, some children are feeling pressure not just to play with their friends, but also succeed.

The New Fortnite Update Adds A Hilarious Tribute To The Map

  The New Fortnite Update Adds A Hilarious Tribute To The Map The neverending onslaught of new Fortnite updates continues, with patch 5.10 now available. It's a notable one, with a new weapon, birthday challenges, and more included, but perhaps best of all are the variety of map changes that have been implemented--one of which is quite funny, though it requires you to know where to look. To understandTo understand this tribute on the map, you need to be familiar with the plight of Chappadoodle. Recently, streamer Muselk published a video of an attempted rescue operation in Fortnite. He sees an All-Terrain Kart nearing the edge of the map and goes to investigate, only to discover a player--Chappadoodle--has fallen far off the edge of the map but somehow managed to survive.

Parents across the world are starting to pay for tutors to help their kids develop skills at Fortnite . The Wall Street Journal wrote an article detailing various parents and their children involved in this A software developer from Texas paid $ 20 an hour for his 12-year-old son to take Fortnite lessons.

apocalypse, parents are shelling out up to $ 20 an hour for coaches to help their children suck less at Fortnite . And I’ve yet to hear anyone draw the ire of their Facebook parenting group for paying thousands of dollars a year on athletic coaches, or private tutors that not only keep kids indoors, but

“There’s pressure not to just play it but to be really good at it,” said Ally Hicks, who bought four hours of lessons for her 10-year-old son. “You can imagine what that was like for him at school.”

Nick Mennen, who’s been paying coaches to tutor his son, Noble, said the 12-year-old’s gone from struggling in the game to “throw[ing] down 10 to 20 wins”.

Fortnite” is celebrating its one-year anniversary with a handful of additional “Birthday Challenges”, and recently delivered a new patch.

Parents Are Paying For ‘Fortnite’ Tutors, But That’s Not the Problem .
When he was 11 years old, Demis Hassabis was the second highest-rated chess player in the world for his age. His parents had taken him out of school to practice and focus on the game. During a tournament in Liechtenstein, he matched the Danish chess champion move-for-move for over ten hours of competitive play. They then spent four hours in a near-stalemate. Finally, Hassabis resigned, at which point the champion showed him the move he might have made to continue the match. The young Demis had an epiphany. “It made me think, ‘Are we wasting our minds?’” he told Kirsty Young of BBC Radio decades later. “At that level of chess, they’re all fantastically smart people.

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