Technology China space lab may fall to Earth later: European Space Agency

18:45  31 march  2018
18:45  31 march  2018 Source:   afp.com

Two Americans, one Russian blast off for ISS from Kazakhstan

  Two Americans, one Russian blast off for ISS from Kazakhstan Two astronauts, a cosmonaut and a ball set to be used in the forthcoming football World Cup in Russia blasted off Wednesday for a two-day flight to the International Space Station. NASA's Drew Feustel and Richard Arnold lifted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a five month mission in a Soyuz MS-08 under the command of Russian colleague Oleg Artemyev at the expected time of 1744 GMT.

China 's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late as Monday morning GMT. Chinese authorities have said the roughly eight-tonne Tiangong-1 is unlikely to cause any damage when it

China 's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late as Monday morning GMT. Chinese space lab to fall back to Earth in March.

The Tiangong-1 space lab is expected to make a fiery plunge back to Earth by Monday. © Provided by AFP The Tiangong-1 space lab is expected to make a fiery plunge back to Earth by Monday. China's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late as Monday morning GMT. 

The ESA, which is tracking the craft, had earlier given a window of between midday Saturday and early Sunday afternoon GMT.

Chinese authorities have said the roughly eight-tonne Tiangong-1 is unlikely to cause any damage when it comes down and that its fiery disintegration will offer a "splendid" show akin to a meteor shower.  The abandoned craft is expected to make its plunge between Sunday afternoon and early Monday morning GMT, the ESA said in a blog post announcing its revised forecast.

A Chinese Space Lab is Going to Fall to Earth — And Nobody Knows Where It Will Land

  A Chinese Space Lab is Going to Fall to Earth — And Nobody Knows Where It Will Land Chinese space lab Tiangong-1 (or “heavenly palace”) is set to fall back to Earth some time at the end of March or beginning of April. The catch: It’s unclear where it will fall. Load Error The 19,000-pound space lab — China’s precursor to a space station, according to NPR — was decommissioned and de-orbited in 2016, after being in use for nearly five years, Popular Mechanics reported. It has been replaced with Tiangong-2.Tiangong-1’s fall to Earth is different from that of other space debris, which often have a controlled burn through the atmosphere and land in the ocean.

China ’s defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late Such falling spacecraft do “not crash into the Earth fiercely like in sci-fi movies, but turn into a splendid (meteor shower) and move across

China insists eight tonne space station is unlikely to cause any damage when it crashes to earth over the Easter Tiangong-1, an eight-tonne space lab the size of a school bus, is due to rip across the sky as it makes a The agency said calmer space weather was now expected as a high-speed stream

In its update on Saturday the agency said calmer space weather was now expected as a high-speed stream of solar particles did not cause an increase in the density of the upper atmosphere, as previously expected. Such an increase in density would have pulled the spacecraft down sooner, it said.

The re-entry window remains "highly variable," the ESA cautioned. There is similar uncertainty about where debris from the lab could land. But there is "no need for people to worry" the China Manned Space Engineering Office (CMSEO) said earlier on its WeChat social media account. Such falling spacecraft do "not crash into the Earth fiercely like in sci-fi movies, but turn into a splendid (meteor shower) and move across the beautiful starry sky as they race towards the Earth," it said.

Chinese space lab Tiangong-1 to fall to Earth within days

  Chinese space lab Tiangong-1 to fall to Earth within days An out-of-control Chinese space lab, the Tiangong-1, is expected to fall to Earth within days, according to the latest estimate from the European Space Agency (ESA), which is monitoring its descent. The ESA's Space Debris Office said that the re-entry window for the Tiangong-1 space station was between March 30 and April 2 although it warned the estimate was "highly variable." While posing minimal risk to humans, the uncontrolled re-entry of the space lab is a blot on China's ambitious space program. The 8.5 ton Tiangong-1 "ceased functioning" on March 16, 2016, China told the United Nations in May 2017, without specifying why.

BEIJING: China 's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as Such falling spacecraft do "not crash into the Earth fiercely like in sci-fi movies, but turn into a splendid (meteor shower) and move

China 's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late Such falling spacecraft do "not crash into the Earth fiercely like in sci-fi movies, but turn into a splendid (meteor shower) and move across

Tiangong-1 — or "Heavenly Palace" — was placed in orbit in September 2011 and had been slated for a controlled re-entry, but it ceased functioning in March 2016 and space enthusiasts have been bracing for its fiery return since.

The ESA said the lab will make an "uncontrolled re-entry" as ground teams are no longer able to fire its engines or thrusters for orbital adjustments. A Chinese spaceflight engineer, however, denied earlier this year that it was out of control.

China will step up efforts to coordinate with the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs as the re-entry nears, foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang told reporters on Friday. Beijing sees its multi-billion-dollar space program as a symbol of the country's rise. It plans to send a manned mission to the moon in the future. China sent another lab, Tiangong-2, into orbit in September 2016 as a stepping stone to its goal of having a crewed space station by 2022. 

China’s Space Station May Crash to Earth on April Fools’ Day

  China’s Space Station May Crash to Earth on April Fools’ Day <p>China’s first space station, Tiangong-1, abandoned and out of control, is expected to drop out of orbit around this weekend, with pieces of it likely to survive the fiery re-entry and crash somewhere on Earth.</p>China’s first space station, Tiangong-1, abandoned and out of control, is expected to drop out of orbit around this weekend, with pieces of it likely to survive the fiery re-entry and crash somewhere on Earth.

China ’s defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late Such falling spacecraft do “not crash into the Earth fiercely like in sci-fi movies, but turn into a splendid (meteor shower) and move across

China 's defunct space lab could hurtle back to Earth later than previously forecast, with the European Space Agency saying it may re-enter the atmosphere as late as Monday morning GMT.

'Spectacular show'

During the re-entry, atmospheric drag will rip away solar arrays, antennas and other external components at an altitude of around 100 kilometers (60 miles), according to the Chinese space office.

The intensifying heat and friction will cause the main structure to burn or blow up, and it should disintegrate at an altitude of around 80 kilometers, it said.

Most fragments will dissipate in the air and a small amount of debris will fall relatively slowly before landing across hundreds of square kilometers, most likely in the ocean, which covers more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface.

Experts have downplayed any concerns about the Tiangong-1 causing any damage when it hurtles back to Earth, with the ESA noting that nearly 6,000 uncontrolled re-entries of large objects have occurred over the past 60 years without harming anyone.

Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, estimates that Tiangong-1 is the 50th most massive uncontrolled re-entry of an object since 1957, when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the world's first artificial satellite.

At an altitude of 60-70 kilometers, debris will begin to turn into "a series of fireballs," which is when people on the ground will "see a spectacular show," he said.



Scientists hope harpoons can skewer space junk crisis .
A European satellite launched this week to try out ways of tackling the growing amount of garbage in space will use technology as familiar to the ancient Romans as astronauts - nets and harpoons. Engineers who have designed and created harpoons for two pioneering space debris clearing projects said the appeal of such time-tested concepts was their simplicity."The irony is not lost on us," said Alastair Wayman, an advanced projects engineer at Airbus Space in the southern English town of Stevenage.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/news/science-and-technology/-131801-china-space-lab-may-fall-to-earth-later-european-space-agency/

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