Politics Burned by the budget, right warns Ryan on immigration

15:17  13 february  2018
15:17  13 february  2018 Source:   thehill.com

Republican agenda clouded by division

  Republican agenda clouded by division Republicans are divided over transportation, immigration and spending coming out of a retreat in West Virginia, clouding the prospect of legislative progress in 2018. GOP leaders at the retreat focused on the accomplishments of last year more than the divisive issues in front of them as they hope to rally the rank-and-file members ahead of primary season and the November general election."Nothing's going to get done this year," acknowledged a senior Republican aide, noting divisions over President Trump's proposed $1.5 trillion infrastructure package and immigration.

House conservatives are warning Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) to take a hard line on immigration or else risk facing a revolt in his own ranks. “ The [ budget ] bill that passed last week wasn’t consistent with what we told the voters we were going to do. We had better get it right on immigration ,” Rep.

But defiant Democrats warned against a plan being floated by Ryan that would temporarily cover domestic spending but fund military spending through the end of the year as a way to rally support from his fractured caucus, including conservatives who oppose concessions on immigration .

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House conservatives are warning Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) to take a hard line on immigration or else risk facing a revolt in his own ranks.

While no GOP lawmakers are calling for a leadership change, frustrated conservatives are pressuring Ryan to put a hard-line immigration bill authored by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) on the House floor in the coming weeks.

The growing calls underscore how Ryan, who has not yet announced whether he plans to run for reelection, is walking a political tightrope after passing a massive budget deal that was unpopular with conservatives.

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U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan on Thursday said Republicans will move on immigration legislation backed by President Donald Trump after lawmakers finish with the current budget deal.

So what we want to get right is lasting immigration reform." Ken Calvert (R-Calif.) added. Cardenas noted that the Ryan budget tackles other issues, such as Medicare. Speaking in 2001 as Tory leader, Hague warned that a second term of a Blair government would turn Britain into a "foreign land".

"The [budget] bill that passed last week wasn't consistent with what we told the voters we were going to do. We had better get it right on immigration," Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), a House Freedom Caucus leader, told The Hill.

"Hopefully, we'll see an earnest effort this week to get to 218 votes for a conservative [immigration] bill," said Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.).

"We better see some progress on the Goodlatte bill," he added.

Ryan helped muscle a sweeping, bipartisan budget deal through Congress last week that sets the stage for $300 billion more in federal spending over the next two years. The measure also raises the debt ceiling for one year, knocking two major to-do items off lawmakers' plate.

House conservatives balked over the plan, forcing Ryan and his leadership team to rely on Democrats to help get the legislation over the finish line.

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But Ryan ’s business-centric approach in favor of boosting legal immigration and letting undocumented immigrants “get right with the law” are Howard Berman (D-Calif.) and Dick Chrysler (R-Mich.) that warned against a restrictive immigration bill, from then-Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.) and Rep.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan , R-Wis., confers with Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., right , during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington The bill would break the existing budget cap for defense by billion — almost billion more than the budget Trump proposed last year.

In the end, a total of 167 Republicans backed the package. The previous two-year budget deal garnered just 79 GOP votes.

Many defense hawks ended up holding their noses to vote for the bill, which delivered a long-sought funding boost for the U.S. military.

The deal was negotiated by leaders on both sides of the Capitol, but was announced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.).

Ryan seemed to emerge generally unscathed from the fight, despite the deal's unpopularity with conservatives.

But Ryan might not get another pass when it comes to the immigration debate, which is the next big policy fight facing Congress.

Trump is rescinding the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. He has given Congress until March 5 to come up with a permanent legal solution for the program, which protects certain immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children.

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How Myanmar forces burned , looted and killed in a remote village. The people who know no war: Afghanistan’s most isolated corner. House Democrats said Pelosi appealed to members to vote against the budget bill if Ryan did not provide a stronger commitment on immigration , though

"We must pass this budget agreement first, though, so that we can get on to that," Ryan said, pressing Pelosi and other Democratic Party holdouts to accept the budget deal. Ryan says he is committed to bringing a DACA and immigration reform bill to the floor

Ryan last week said he's serious about passing legislation to help people who have been enrolled in DACA.

"I know that there is a real commitment to solving the DACA challenge in both political parties. That's a commitment that I share. To anyone who doubts my intention to solve this problem and bring up a DACA and immigration reform bill, do not," Ryan said.

"We will bring a solution to the floor - one that the president will sign," he said.

Conservatives say the solution Ryan is looking for is the Goodlatte bill, which has buy-in from key committee chairmen and has attracted support from both the moderate and conservative wings of the GOP conference.

"I think there would be a lot of folks who would be surprised if the House [immigration] bill is not the Goodlatte bill," said Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio). "I've certainly heard some rumblings that people would be surprised and reactionary."

In exchange for the Freedom Caucus's support for a short-term government funding bill last month, Ryan agreed to put a team together to build support for the Goodlatte legislation. He also promised to put the bill on the floor if it could get 218 GOP votes.

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Ryan hasn't scheduled House consideration, infuriating Democrats, but he said Friday, "We will focus on bringing that debate to this floor and finding a solution." No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Richard Durbin of Illinois, a leader in the immigration fight, said the budget pact "opens the door" for Senate

Ryan hasn’t scheduled House consideration, infuriating Democrats, but he said Friday, “We will focus on bringing No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Richard Durbin of Illinois, a leader in the immigration fight, said the budget pact “opens the door” for Senate votes on protecting the young immigrants .

But members of the conservative group have complained that leaders are not doing enough to build support for the bill.

"I certainly haven't seen a strong whip effort on the part of leadership to get the Goodlatte bill on the floor," Jordan said.

The House majority whip's office has emphasized that listening sessions taking place on the measure are a critical first step in the process of building support for the legislation, which is necessary before it can be brought to the House floor. A similar process was used for tax reform, the office said.

But Davidson said "there's not quite the same feel" when it comes to the Goodlatte bill.

Despite the rumblings of discontent, conservatives aren't throwing out the threat of offering a "motion to vacate the chair" - which would force a vote on whether to strip Ryan of his Speaker's gavel - if Ryan doesn't follow through on his promise to only put an immigration bill on the floor if it has a majority of the GOP's support.

But the threat of such a motion dogged his predecessor, former Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), who often faced challenges to his gavel, including over the issue of immigration.

Ryan is trying to thread the needle by promising to solve DACA in a way that does not upset members of his own conference.

The Goodlatte bill is further to the right than the proposals being considered in the Senate or the framework outlined by the White House.

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Ryan hasn't scheduled House consideration, infuriating Democrats, but he said Friday, "We will focus on bringing that debate to this floor and finding a solution." No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Richard Durbin of Illinois, a leader in the immigration fight, said the budget pact "opens the door" for Senate

The bill set spending caps, not appropriations, and the budget revisions will show how the new spending should be done, Mulvaney said. Jordan said he wishes that Speaker Paul Ryan would have stood firm against it -- especially as Congress takes up the controversial topic of immigration .

The legislation would offer a renewable, three-year legal status for DACA recipients in exchange for authorizing border wall funding, ending family-based immigration and eliminating the diversity visa lottery program.

It also would crack down on so-called sanctuary cities, increase criminal penalties for deported criminals who try to return to the U.S. and require employers to use an electronic verification system to ensure they only hire legal workers.

But it's unclear whether the Goodlatte bill can get a majority in the House, with some Republicans representing the agricultural industry concerned about the E-Verify language. There could also be concern that putting the bill on the floor could upset the high-level, bipartisan DACA negotiations that are currently taking place among the leadership.

While many Republicans are expecting to see some version of the Goodlatte measure pass the House, others aren't quite as confident.

"Here is what worries me: The Speaker, just a few years ago, was a leader in our party in fiscal responsibility and yet we got a [budget] bill like we did last week," Jordan said. "And now we are heading into an immigration debate where we know the Speaker historically has not been where the country is, or the Republican Party is, on immigration."

Ryan may have less to risk in the debate, however, if he doesn't plan on sticking around in Congress next year. He said he would make a final decision with his wife this spring on running for reelection.

After Boehner announced his retirement plans, he decided to tackle sticky issues that were unpopular with conservatives, including the previous budget deal, in an effort to "clean the barn" for Ryan before he took over the Speaker's gavel.

But Ryan has insisted that his political future will not impact how he moves forward in the DACA debate.

"It doesn't," Ryan said last week when pressed on how his personal future might play into his immigration decisions. "I don't think about it at all."

The Latest: Senate votes to begin immigration debate .
<p>The Senate has voted to start debating immigration, including whether to protect hundreds of thousands of young immigrants in the U.S. illegally.</p>6:08 p.m.

Source: http://us.pressfrom.com/news/politics/-119812-burned-by-the-budget-right-warns-ryan-on-immigration/

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