Offbeat The staggering scale of California’s wildfires

05:40  08 august  2018
05:40  08 august  2018 Source:   msn.com

There Are 16 Active Wildfires Burning Across California. This Map Shows All of Them

  There Are 16 Active Wildfires Burning Across California. This Map Shows All of Them It's only the beginning of California's wildfire seasonThousands of firefighters are currently battling the flames of 16 active wildfires, which are threatening communities from Redding in Northern California to Riverside County in Southern California.

Analysis Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events. The staggering scale of California ’ s wildfires .

More than a dozen wildfires are scorching Northern California , aided by low humidity and high winds. Here are some eye-popping numbers that tell the scope of the tragedy.

A plane drops fire retardant as firefighters continue to battle a wildfire in the Cleveland National Forest near Corona, Calif. on Aug. 7, 2018. (Watchara Phomicinda/The Orange County Register/AP) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post A plane drops fire retardant as firefighters continue to battle a wildfire in the Cleveland National Forest near Corona, Calif. on Aug. 7, 2018. (Watchara Phomicinda/The Orange County Register/AP)

The wildfire burning at the southern end of Mendocino National Forest in California is now the largest in the state’s history, consuming nearly 300,000 acres and growing. That’s hard to visualize, so we can put it another way: The area that has been consumed is the equivalent of more than seven times the size of Washington, D.C. It’s a bit less than half the size of Rhode Island. The Mendocino Complex Fire, as it’s called, passed the previous record-holder, the Thomas Fire, this week.

Firefighters From Australia and New Zealand Are Coming to Help Battle California's Wildfires

  Firefighters From Australia and New Zealand Are Coming to Help Battle California's Wildfires Fires are currently burning across 1.4 million acres in 13 states , driven by windy conditions and a dry, hot summer. The biggest is the Carr Fire in Northern California, which has killed six people, including two firefighters, and prompted the evacuation of 37,000 from their homes. “We are very appreciative of the Australian and New Zealand firefighters for their availability to assist us with our current fire situation,” said Dan Smith, the chair of the U.S.’s National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group.

A police officers looks at the devastation wrought by wildfires in the Coffey Park neighborhood of Santa Rosa, California , on October 11, 2017. The toll from Northern California ' s ranging wildfires continued to grow as officials said the fires destroyed up to 2

A large production- scale rebuilding approach was utilized previously in California wildfires , including in 2003, 2007 and 2008. The biggest of those was in San Diego' s Scripps Ranch community after the 2003 Cedar fire , a deadly blaze that destroyed a total of more than 2

It wasn’t an old record: The Thomas Fire burned in December. The other major fire burning in California — the Carr Fire, near Redding — is the 12th largest in the state’s history. Like the Mendocino Complex Fire, it’s also still growing.

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The scale of that fire was impressive even more than a week ago.

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Those two fires have helped make 2018 one of the most destructive in state history. Although the number of fires in 2018 tracks with the number to this point in 2017, the size of the fires is more than twice as large. Data from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, shows how 2018 compares with past years within its jurisdiction in terms of fires. Note that although there were more fires from 1970 to 2000 or so, they didn’t burn as much area.

Okanagan County, Wash. fire grows to 7,000 acres

  Okanagan County, Wash. fire grows to 7,000 acres Washington's next big wildfire grew even larger on Saturday. The Gilbert fire, burning west of Twisp in Okanagan County, grew from 6,000 to 7,000 acres on Friday night. The fire started as two separate blazes -- Gilbert and Crescent -- burning, which were sparked earlier in the week when lightning struck; they were listed at only 250 acres on Wednesday. RELATED: Washington's wildfires stay cool in July, even as the West Coast burnsOver the next day, however, the blaze rapidly swelled to thousands of acres during a period of activity that officials monitoring labelled as "extreme.

California wildfires in 2017: A staggering toll of lost life and homes. 11: Large wildfires had destroyed or damaged more than 10,000 structures in California this year, a higher tally than the last nine years combined.

A spate of California wildfires has destroyed an area larger than New York City and Boston combined. And with about 65% of the colossal Thomas Fire contained, the end may be a way off.

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The dry southeastern part of California and the agriculture-rich Central Valley has not had many wildfires, but the rest of the state has. Visual data from Cal Fire shows that the distribution of the fires is fairly even over time, but the scale of the fires has been more significant in recent years.

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Or, to compare the fires over time on one map:

a close up of a map © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

President Trump’s response to the fires has been to highlight a long-standing dispute in the state about the allocation of water between conservation, urban areas and agriculture. This may be a function of how important that fight is to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), a staunch ally of the president. Several years ago, we looked at how the water fight played out in and around Nunes’s Central Valley district; at the time, the state’s deep drought was making the struggle over water even more acute.

Trump, Jerry Brown make dueling claims on cause of California fires

  Trump, Jerry Brown make dueling claims on cause of California fires The president is pointing his finger at environmental laws. The governor is blaming climate change. And both are getting hammered.And both are getting hammered for their remarks.

More than a dozen wildfires are scorching Northern California , aided by the state' s epic drought, low humidity and high winds. National & World News. Downed power lines sparked last fall’ s deadly California fires , state says.

NOAA' s GOES16 shows wildfires raging in Northern California , Oct. 9, 2017. Image 93 of 93. Satellite imagery shows staggering amount of smoke spewing from California wildfires .

Scientists ascribe the wildfire activity in part to global warming, which would help explain why the problem seems to have gotten worse in recent years. Among the expectations that researchers have from a warming world is that individual wildfires will be more severe than in past years. Speaking to the San Francisco Chronicle, Bill Stewart, a forestry specialist at the University of California at Berkeley, hinted that Trump’s rhetoric was meant to confuse the issue.

“Fire behavior now is off the charts,” Stewart said. “Trump wants to get climate change off the agenda, and no one seems to be talking about climate change now because everyone wants to know what’s on his mind.”

Authorities in California say that, despite Trump’s assertions, they have enough water to battle the fires. One way in which that water is used, of course, is by dropping it on affected areas.

A sight that, hopefully, no Californians are still in the vicinity to experience.

California paying inmates $1 per hour to fight large wildfires .
About 2,000 inmates are working alongside 12,000 other firefighters to combat the deadly and widespread California wildfires. Load Error

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